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Army Corps of Engineers invites volunteers to participate in National Public Lands Day, Sept. 26
9/21/2020
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers welcomes volunteers to continue the annual tradition of public service by participating in this year’s National Public Lands Day on Saturday, Sept. 26. Events will be...
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to resume collection of day use recreation fees October 1
9/18/2020
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced today that it will resume the collection of fees at its day use recreation areas beginning October 1. Fee collections were suspended earlier this year when...
Army Corps of Engineers seeks public comments on proposal to renew and revise nationwide permits
9/15/2020
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced today it is seeking comments on its proposal to renew and revise 52 nationwide permits for work in wetlands and other waters that are regulated by Section...

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  • ERDC’s Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory awarded construction contract for new climatic chamber facility

    On July 9, 2020, the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center announced that the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) was awarded an Unspecified Minor Military Construction Authority (UMMCA) contract to build a climatic chamber facility on the Hanover, New Hampshire, campus.
  • PUBLICATION NOTICE: Preliminary Assessment of Landform Soil Strength on Glaciated Terrain in New Hampshire

    Abstract: Accurate terrain characterization is important for predicting off-road vehicle mobility. Soil strength is a significant terrain characteristic affecting vehicle mobility. Collecting soil strength measurements is laborious, making in-situ observations sparse. Research has focused on providing soil strength estimates using remote sensing techniques that can provide large spatial and temporal estimates, but the results are often inaccurate. Past attempts have quantified the soil properties of arid environments using landform assessments; yet many military operating environments occupy high latitude regions with landscapes dominated by glacial deposits. This study took preliminary strength measurements for glacial landforms deposited from the Laurentide Ice Sheet in New England. A range of common glacial landforms were sampled to assess shear strength, bearing capacity, and volumetric moisture content. Glacial outwash landforms had the highest average shear strengths, glacial deltas the lowest. There was a significant negative correlation between silt content and shear strength of the soil, a significant positive correlation between bearing capacity and clay content, and a significant negative correlation with sand content. Moisture content of soils was inversely correlated to the abundance of gravel in the deposit. This work provides initial insight to this approach on glaciated terrain, but continued sampling will provide more robust correlations.
  • PUBLICATION NOTICE: Improved Vehicle Mobility by Using Terrain Surfacing Systems

    Abstract: Even for military vehicles designed with superior off-road capabilities, problematic soil conditions can impede mobility, particularly when many vehicles need to traverse the same path. Loose sands with little shear strength or wet silts or clays with little bearing capacity can deform rapidly under traffic. U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center researchers conducted field testing over several terrain conditions to measure performance of terrain surfacing systems designed to improve vehicle mobility. Soil conditions included poorly-graded sand, medium-strength silt, weak marsh, and two different slope conditions. Five different terrain surfacing, or matting systems, were tested that included four commercial variants and one U.S. government design. All testing took place at the ERDC Ground Vehicle Terrain Surfacing Test Facility in Vicksburg, Mississippi. Military test vehicles included a Marine Tactical Vehicle Replacement, Common Bridge Transporter, and M1 Abrams tank. Results from the testing showed that all matting systems provided notable improvement in the number of allowable vehicle passes over soft sands. Results varied for the different systems over weaker soils, with performance improved for those matting systems having thicker and stiffer panels. However, improved performance among matting systems came with a sacrifice of increased logistical burden. Data presented here-in include detailed site characteristics and soil deformation as a function of traffic.
  • PUBLICATION NOTICE: Laboratory Characterization of Rapid-Setting Flowable Fill

    Abstract: Utility Fill One-Step 750® is a rapid-setting flowable fill product that has previously been validated in numerous full-scale demonstrations as an expedient backfill solution for Rapid Airfield Damage Recovery. Although the field performance of Utility Fill One-Step 750® has been extensively documented, a full laboratory characterization has not been conducted. This report analyzes and documents results from several laboratory tests conducted at two water to-product ratios. The tests conducted are based on the suite of tests that make up the triservice spall repair certification program used for rapid-setting concrete products. Tests include strength and set time-related properties, typical parameter control tests for concrete, and tests to determine the mineralogy and chemical makeup of the material. Long-term expansion and contraction properties were also tested. The data presented herein are intended to provide an overall assessment of Utility Fill One-Step 750® and to provide reasonable estimates of various design parameters. The results can be used as a basis for the future development of a formal laboratory certification protocol to down-select other rapid-setting flowable fill products for further evaluation.
  • PUBLICATION NOTICE: Application of Chirp Acoustic Sub-Bottom Data in Riverine Environments: Identification of Underlying Rocky Hazards at Cape Girardeau, Missouri, and Thebes, Illinois

    NOTE: A revised version of the report MRG&P Report No. 31 has been published. While the link below remains valid, the PDF attached to the record is new. It is now 47 pages instead of 45 pages after the changes made. Please update your records as needed.
  • PUBLICATION NOTICE: Lake Providence to Old River Geomorphology Assessment

    Abstract: This report integrates information from previous geomorphic studies coupled with new analysis to provide a comprehensive geomorphic characterization of the Lake Providence (River Mile [RM] 487.2 Above Head of Passes [AHP]) to Old River Control Complex, (RM 317 AHP) reach from the early-1800s to present. Individual components of this study included the following: historical geomorphic studies, development of an events timeline, specific gage records, stage and flow duration trends, trends in water surface slopes, bed material studies, suspended sediment data, channel geometry data, and effects of channel improvement features (cutoffs, dike, revetment, and dredging). These individual assessments were consolidated to develop an overall assessment of how the study reach has evolved since the early-1800s.
  • PUBLICATION NOTICE: Baldcypress (Taxodium distichum) at the Wallisville Lake Project: A Review of Applicable Literature and Management Considerations

    Abstract: Changing hydropatterns within the Wallisville Lake Project, near the mouth of the Trinity River in Chambers and Liberty Counties, Texas, have the potential to alter baldcypress forest resiliency. Increasing water levels support saltwater barrier operations while maintaining navigation and recreational access. However, potential impacts of increased water levels on the baldcypress forests are of particular concern because these ecosystems provide unique ecological value and wildlife habitat. The maintenance, succession, and resiliency of baldcypress under various flooding, salinity, and inundation regimes remain poorly defined and pose challenges to resource managers. This report reviews available literature pertaining to salinity and inundation impacts to baldcypress forests. Specific emphasis is placed on the ecological effects of water quality and quantity on the health and persistence of baldcypress. The information gathered in this report is intended to supplement material in the Wallisville Lake Project Water Control Manual to improve management of baldcypress forest conditions and avoid negative ecological impacts. Additionally, this report provides management considerations designed to maintain or enhance baldcypress forests within the Wallisville Lake Project.
  • CRREL, Area Fire Departments and the NH Department Environmental Services work to contain spill

    The Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory discovered a Number 2 heating oil leak from a boiler at its facility at approximately 4 p.m., Saturday, April 25. The CRREL facility is located at 72 Lyme Road in Hanover. No injuries have been reported. CRREL, along with the Hanover, Lebanon, Hartford and Norwich Fire Departments and the New Hampshire Department for Environmental Services are working together to contain the spill. Residents are asked to stay away from the area at this time.
  • DoD High Performance Computing Modernization Supports the Fight Against COVID-19

    From modeling the movement of how droplets travel through an aircraft to conducting virtual screenings of vaccine possibilities, the Department of Defense High Performance Computing Modernization Program has a powerful weapon in the fight against COVID-19—supercomputers.
  • CRREL employee tests positive for COVID-19

    A U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center employee assigned to the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, based in Hanover, New Hampshire has tested positive for COVID-19. The employee is currently in a quarantine status at home. All personnel who have come into contact with the infected employee have been notified and the laboratory continues to enforce safety measures to protect the workforce. The ERDC is continuing to restrict access to only mission critical personnel and essential services contractors at its facilities in New Hampshire and across the nation. In addition, the organization continues to closely adhere to all official federal and state safety and health directives to protect the workforce and prevent the spread of COVID-19.