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Archive: July, 2014
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  • July

    Craney Island safety, health management program reaches pinnacle, earns VPP Star status

    PORTSMOUTH, Va. -- The bulletin board just inside the door of Craney Island project office here has a folder with blank reports for “near misses.”
  • Kansas City District supports Pacific Command in Southeast Asia

    "The times, they are a-changin'," sang Bob Dylan 50 years ago as the U.S. Army fought a war in Vietnam. What would Dylan think today when a member of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) visited Vietnam in May to present dam safety information to stakeholders from across Southeast Asia?
  • Reducing the impact of invasive species through partnership

    In an effort to reduce the impact of invasive species, Coralville Lake was one of the first agencies to sign a memorandum of understanding with the Hawkeye Cooperative Weed Management Area (CWMA) in 2007. This partnership is just one of the ways the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is working with others to fight invasive species. Since then, the Mississippi River Project has also signed an MOU with them.
  • Stopping an aggressive aquatic hitchhiker

    Buffalo District, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC),
  • Florida agencies work together

    Across Florida and throughout the nation, invasive species bring with them high ecological and economic costs. It’s far too big a problem for just one agency or group. The Florida Invasive Species Partnership (FISP) is a collaborative group of federal, state and local agencies and non-government organizations, all with a stake in managing non-native species in Florida. FISP facilitates the formation of Cooperative Invasive Species Management Areas (CISMAs), alliances of stakeholders addressing regional invasive species management. Some of the concerns they try to address include prevention, education/awareness, early detection, rapid response, monitoring and integrated pest management.
  • Nipping invasive air potato 'in the spud'

    It’s almost like a scene from a science fiction movie. Florida is being taken over by potatoes. Yes, potatoes. So, what do you do when foreign potatoes invade and attempt to take over the native plants? You try to “nip it in the spud!”
  • Slowing the spread of new invasives

    For the past decade, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and state departments of natural resources — especially those near the Great Lakes — have focused their efforts on controlling the migration of Asian Carp, a known invasive species, before it reaches the Great Lakes. It’s been a challenge.
  • U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ trail designated as a National Recreation Trail

    The North Slope Trail at Lake Sonoma, in Healdsburg, California, has been designated a national recreation trail by the U.S. Department of the Interior. The trail is managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, San Francisco District and is among 21 trails nationwide designated this year as new national recreation trails.
  • Congress authorizes eight Jacksonville District projects

    Eight U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville District projects that will provide critical infrastructure to local ports and ecosystem restoration efforts in Florida received approval as part of the Water Resources Reform and Development Act (WRRDA) of 2014, which was signed by President Barack Obama June 10.
  • Eyre relinquishes command of Transatlantic Division, retires

    Maj. Gen. Michael Eyre, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Transatlantic Division commander, relinquished command and retired from the U.S. Army during a Relinquishment of Command and Retirement Ceremony June 27 at the Stonewall Jackson headquarters here.
  • USACE commander urges U.S. infrastructure improvement

    WASHINGTON-- The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers faces aging technology, shortage of funding and a lack of citizen awareness, said its commander. Lt. Gen. Thomas P. Bostick, the Army's chief of engineers and USACE commanding general, spoke Thursday, at a Civil Works Infrastructure roundtable conference.