Engineering Research and Development Center

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  • March

    USACE ‘pushing the boundaries’ of research and development

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and its Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) announce the release of the FY23 USACE R&D Annual Report, a deep dive into the innovation and critical thinking throughout the organization to tackle tough engineering challenges and transform future operations. The report highlights dozens of ongoing projects and programs being executed in USACE’s premier research laboratories and the ways in which the techniques and technologies developed in those laboratories are being deployed across the USACE enterprise.
  • October

    Crowdsourcing bathymetry could provide near-time picture of nation’s inland waterways

    The more the merrier. That common saying could be the motto for an effort within the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to create a near real-time system that would track the safety and accessibility of our nation’s inland waterways.
  • Global Hydro Intelligence analysis unlocks secure water resources

    Through the mighty waves and gentle streams of Earth’s waters flow countless opportunities for scientific discovery. Scientists with the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center’s (ERDC) Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory (CHL) are exploring potential opportunities by utilizing Global Hydro Intelligence (GHI) to answer questions about the nation’s bodies of water and the possibilities available for scientists to research.
  • Natural features to play crucial role in building a more resilient Great Lakes coastline

    Communities along the Great Lakes coastline are experiencing increased frequency in coastal flooding and erosion, causing property damage, putting lives at risk, and disrupting local economies. Recent historic high lake levels illustrate the widespread vulnerabilities along the coast.
  • Dwindling capacity at Tuttle Creek Reservoir calls for an urgent and innovative solution

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is no stranger to sediment build-up issues. The organization is responsible for maintaining and managing thousands of miles of inland and intracoastal waterways, channels, ports and harbors with a dredging budget of more than $1.7 billion in fiscal year 2023 alone. Presently, USACE researchers are taking on a slightly different challenge and investigating new methods to diminish the accumulation of sediment in lakes and reservoirs caused by dams.
  • April

    From Antiquated to Automated: USACE wetland delineation tool helps revolutionize regulatory process

    According to the Environmental Protection Agency, United States has lost more than half of its wetlands since the 1600s, and approximately 35 percent of the world’s wetlands were lost between 1970 and 2015. To protect against further impairment of wetlands and the essential functions they provide, the U.S. established a policy of "no net loss" of wetlands, as well as procedures to ensure responsible management of wetland resources.
  • New engineering index will strengthen coastal management decisions

    Coastlines are ever-changing. Whether from nonstop wave action, wind or storms, these landscapes constantly shift and reshape, causing challenges for coastal managers. In response, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) researchers have created a tool to help assess the resiliency of our nation’s coastlines and improve coastal management strategies.
  • USACE team ensures Army’s and DOD’s data is protected

    Rapid technological advancement has ushered in a time of near-constant innovation for the Department of Defense (DOD), bringing both previously unimaginable progress and a marked increase in threats. Cybersecurity has emerged as a critical aspect of day-to-day DOD operations, and the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) Information Technology Laboratory (ITL) is home to a Security Control Assessor-Validator (SCA-V) team that is playing an integral role in securing vulnerable infrastructure and sensitive data.
  • Stronger, Lighter, More Durable: Ultra-High Performance Concrete is key to a more sustainable and modern infrastructure network

    As the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) works to modernize the nation’s infrastructure, it does so at a time when existing infrastructure components are operating well past their original lifespans. In the case of many of the locks supporting inland navigation, new techniques and technologies are critical to make sure lock facilities – some built in the 1930s – continue operating for another 100 years or more.
  • January

    Structural Health Monitoring key to a more resilient, modern infrastructure network

    Given the aging condition of much of the nation’s navigation infrastructure, managers need accurate and real-time information on the conditions of such structures as locks, dams and bridges operating well beyond their expected design lives.

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