Results:
Tag: sustainability
Clear
  • Going Green: Corps prescribed fire program helps double butterfly population

    EUGENE, Ore. -- The population of endangered Fender's blue butterflies has doubled at Fern Ridge Reservoir since last year, according to a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers survey. The Corps' 2012 estimate of 3,769 Fender's blue butterflies at 11 sites near the reservoir west of Eugene, Ore., is the species' largest known population and continues a trend of positive population growth since it was first detected on Corps lands in 1998.
  • Going Green: Rare mushrooms discovered after prescribed burn

    U.S. Army Corps of Engineers botanists discovered a new site for the rare Pruitt's Amanita mushroom at Fern Ridge Reservoir west of Eugene, Ore., recently. Soils and botany student intern Leanna Van Slambrook spotted some white mushrooms popping out of the charred, soggy ground on the southwest side of the reservoir after a prescribed burn and remembered that a rare Amanita had been found after a burn a few years back.
  • Restoring salmon to an urban park

    Crystal Springs Creek is one of thousands of small streams flowing through the Pacific Northwest. Most provide ideal habitat for fish, but this creek has not supported fish passage for about 40 years.
  • LA District continues innovative partnership

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District has helped develop a strong partnership at Alamo Dam and along the Bill Williams River to continue sustaining our nation’s economic and water resources. Through the collaboration, known as the Bill Williams River Corridor Steering Committee, with other government agencies and partners, the Corps ensured the flows from Alamo Dam maximized taxpayer dollars by maintaining a high level of sustainability for a variety of communities.
  • Going Green: USACE LA District continues innovative partnership

    LAKE HAVASU, Ariz. -- The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District has helped develop a strong partnership at Alamo Dam and along the Bill Williams River to continue sustaining our nation's economic and water resources. "Originally, the dam's functions were flood control, water conservation and recreation," said Rene Vermeeren, the LA District's chief of Hydrology/Hydraulics Branch.
  • Corps of Engineers helps build 'green' military base for the future

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Sacramento District is helping build a military base for the future at Fort Hunter Liggett, Calif., one of several U.S. Army pilot installations selected to be net zero energy and net zero waste by 2020. Net zero means the installation will create as much energy as it uses, and reuse and recover all of its waste products. The district is nearing completion on the second of four solar microgrid projects at the installation.
  • Army Corps of Engineers helps build 'green' military installation of future

    SACRAMENTO, Calif.-- Army and sustainability? Using those two words in the same sentence several years ago would have probably been considered the punch line to a joke. But today, a military base that is both environmentally friendly and meets the needs of warfighters, is quickly becoming a reality.
  • Going Green: Corps hydropower is clean, reliable, efficient, flexible, renewable and sustainable

    WALLA WALLA, Wash. -- In the Pacific Northwest, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers produces significant hydroelectric power for the nation at its dams on the Columbia and Snake rivers. Hydroelectric power is clean, reliable, efficient, flexible, renewable and sustainable. The Corps of Engineers is the Nation's largest producer of hydropower, and one of the largest in the world.
  • Going Green: Protecting our Great Lakes from the invasive Asian carp

    "Working with our partners to protect our national treasures, our Great Lakes, from aquatic nuisance species is critical," said U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Chicago District Commander Col. Frederic A. Drummond Jr. "The Corps mission is about sustaining our water resources, sustaining our communities and sustaining our nation's economic resources."
  • Going Green: protecting our Great Lakes from the invasive Asian carp

    The Corps of Engineers, along with its partners in the Asian Carp Regional Coordinating Committee, is committed to preventing these invasive fish from becoming established in the Great Lakes to include putting electricity in water, participating in extensive monitoring to locate the fish, increasing the understanding of DNA water samples and conducting an extensive study that looks at options to prevent the transfer of all aquatic nuisance species between the Great Lakes and Mississippi River basins.