US Army Corps of Engineers
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  • March

    General visits northernmost USACE-run flood control project

    Maj. Gen. William H. Graham, deputy commanding general of civil and emergency operations for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, visited the Moose Creek Dam on Feb. 19 while touring the organization’s northernmost flood control project. Col. Kirk Gibbs, USACE Pacific Ocean Division commander, and Col. Damon Delarosa, USACE Alaska District commander, accompanied the general.
  • January

    Corps partners with Flood Control District 10 to create predictive model to manage the Boise River

    The Corps is using the latest technology to develop tools that communities in Idaho can use to predict flooding. The technology: Two-dimensional modelling.
  • October

    LA District teams up with California Guard for flood-control exercise

    Partnership was the keyword Oct. 8 as the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District teamed up with the California Army National Guard for a flood-control exercise at the Whittier Narrows Dam Basin.
  • July

    Sacramento District’s Hamilton City project combines flood management with ecosystem restoration

    The Hamilton City Flood Damage Reduction and Ecosystem Restoration project is the first of its kind
  • May

    Final Phase of Alamogordo McKinley Channel Flood Control Project Breaks Ground

    Representatives from the city; elected officials; and the contractor, Pate Construction, joined Albuquerque District Commander Lt. Col. Larry Caswell to officially break ground on the $23.9 million final phase of the Alamogordo McKinley Channel Project, May 17, 2019.
  • April

    Concrete placement rolling along at Center Hill’s auxiliary saddle dam

    LANCASTER, Tenn. (April 18, 2019) – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers recently began placing “roller-compacted concrete” to build a reinforcing berm downstream of Center Hill’s auxiliary dam. This construction is the final major risk-reduction contract in the ongoing Center Hill Dam Safety Rehabilitation Project.
  • March

    John Martin Dam

    The John Martin Dam is the major structure in the John Martin Reservoir Project, which project was authorized by Congress under Flood Control Act of June 22, 1936, as a flood Control and water conservation project. This article originally appeared on page 4 of the March 1943 issue of the Albuquerque District Safety News.
  • February

    Buffalo District’s Mount Morris Dam offers flood of benefits to the public

    The massive Mount Morris Dam, situated deep in the Genesee River gorge near the northern end of Letchworth State Park in Livingston County, NY, has been a shield from the destructive power of Mother Nature since its completion in 1952. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District contributes to its success through operation and maintenance of three missions areas: flood risk management, environmental stewardship, and recreation.
  • November

    Next construction phase gets rolling at Center Hill’s auxiliary dam

    SILVER POINT, Tenn. (Nov. 30, 2018) – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District and contractor Thalle Construction Company are moving towards the conclusion of the Center Hill Dam Safety Rehabilitation Project.
  • October

    Community commemorates, dedicates Dale Hollow Dam on 75th Anniversary

    CELINA, Tenn. (Oct. 19, 2018) – As a heavy fog lifted over Dale Hollow Dam and Reservoir during the 75th Anniversary Commemoration this morning, members of the community and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers officials brought into clear focus how communities, homes and farmlands were given up in the early 1940s to make way for the reservoir, and more than a thousand men worked day and night to construct the dam. A few even lost their lives supporting an expedited construction program.

News Releases

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Tag: flood control
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  • Gavins Point Dam releases reduced to winter release rate

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers began reducing the Gavins Point releases to the winter release rate on Nov. 24, marking the end of flow support for the 2020 Missouri River navigation season. “Releases from Gavins Point Dam were reduced from 34,000 cubic feet per second to 17,000 cfs,” said John Remus, Chief of the Missouri River Water Management Division. “Releases from Gavins Point will be adjusted this winter as needed to lessen the impacts of river ice formation on water intakes in the lower river.” Based on the Sept. 1 System storage, Gavins Point Dam winter releases will be at least 17,000 cfs.
  • Gavins Point Dam releases to be reduced to winter release rate in late November

    In two virtual public meetings held Nov. 2, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Missouri River Water Management Division presented current hydrologic conditions and planned operation of the Missouri River mainstem reservoir system for the remainder of 2020. Public meetings are held each fall and spring to update the region on current conditions and planned operations. The Nov. 2 meetings included draft plans for operating the system during 2021.
  • Missouri River Water Management virtual public meetings set for Nov. 2

    The Missouri River Water Management Division invites the public to participate in one of two virtual public meetings scheduled for Nov. 2. The meetings will take place at 1:30 p.m. and 6 p.m. central time. Details for connecting to each webinar is posted to our website.
  • Corps updates stakeholders on Missouri River Mainstem System operations

    The US Army Corps of Engineers Missouri River Water Management Division hosted an update call on Thursday, Oct. 22, for Congressional representatives, Tribal, and state and local government officials, to include emergency managers, local levee sponsors and the media to discuss current conditions, and the projected operation of the mainstem reservoir system as part of the Draft Annual Operating Plan which was released in mid-September for public comment.
  • Red River Structure Physical Model Study

    Abstract: A proposed Red River Structure (RRS), intended to function as one of three gated structures comprising the Fargo-Moorhead Metropolitan Area Flood Risk Management Project, was tested in a general physical model. A 1:40 Froude-scale was applied to model the structure, engineered channels, existing bathymetry/topography in the Red River and overbank areas, and the proposed Southern Embankment. The physical model was used to ensure that the RRS could pass at least 104,300 cfs during the Probable Maximum Flood while maintaining a maximum pool water surface elevation of 923.5 ft. The physical model was also utilized to optimize the approach structure, stilling basin, retaining walls, and erosion protection designs. The physical modeling effort resulted in an optimized stilling basin wall, retaining wall, and end sill geometry/configuration where erosive conditions were not observed outside and adjacent to the stilling basin. Properly designed riprap (St. Paul District’s R470 gradation) proved to be successful in protecting the proposed RRS from potential scour downstream. The modified approach wall design proved to be successful in creating safe approach flow conditions as well as acceptable flow separation patterns. It is recommended that Alternative 3 be the design used going forward.
  • Red River Structure Physical Model Study

    Abstract: A proposed Red River Structure (RRS), intended to function as one of three gated structures comprising the Fargo-Moorhead Metropolitan Area Flood Risk Management Project, was tested in a general physical model. A 1:40 Froude-scale was applied to model the structure, engineered channels, existing bathymetry/topography in the Red River and overbank areas, and the proposed Southern Embankment. The physical model was used to ensure that the RRS could pass at least 104,300 cfs during the Probable Maximum Flood while maintaining a maximum pool water surface elevation of 923.5 ft. The physical model was also utilized to optimize the approach structure, stilling basin, retaining walls, and erosion protection designs. The physical modeling effort resulted in an optimized stilling basin wall, retaining wall, and end sill geometry/configuration where erosive conditions were not observed outside and adjacent to the stilling basin. Properly designed riprap (St. Paul District’s R470 gradation) proved to be successful in protecting the proposed RRS from potential scour downstream. The modified approach wall design proved to be successful in creating safe approach flow conditions as well as acceptable flow separation patterns. It is recommended that Alternative 3 be the design used going forward.
  • Below average runoff continues in the upper Missouri River basin

    September precipitation was well-below normal in the Missouri River Basin.  As a result, September runoff in the upper Missouri River Basin above Sioux City, Iowa was 69% of average.  Since January 1, precipitation in the upper Basin is well-below normal.  The National Weather Service’s Climate Prediction Center (CPC) is forecasting that below-normal precipitation will continue in October.  The 2020 calendar year runoff forecast for the upper Basin, updated on October 1, is 30.2 million acre-feet (MAF), 117% of average. Average annual runoff for the upper Basin is 25.8 MAF.
  • August inflows much below average in northern Missouri River Basin

    August precipitation was well-below normal in the Missouri River Basin, particularly in the western and far northern portions, which received less than 25% of normal precipitation. The lack of precipitation and dry soil conditions resulted in 74% of average August runoff in the Missouri River Basin above Sioux City, Iowa (upper Basin). The 2020 calendar year forecast for the upper Basin, updated on September 1, is 30.6 million acre-feet (MAF), 119% of average. Average annual runoff for the upper Basin is 25.8 MAF. Runoff in the upper Basin during the remainder of 2020 is forecast to be below average.
  • Corps of Engineers closes Missouri River Levee System L-536 breach near Corning, Missouri

    OMAHA, Neb. – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District closed another breach along the Missouri River Levee System L-536, northwest of Corning, Missouri Saturday.
  • Corps Deactivates Phase II Flood Fight

    Water levels along the Mississippi River have dropped prompting the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New Orleans District to move from Phase II to Phase I flood fight procedures.