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Corps Signs Partnership Agreement for Water Treatment Plant Upgrades

Published Dec. 16, 2020
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Pittsburgh District has entered into a more than $3.3-million project partnership agreement with the city of Chester to complete upgrades to the city’s water treatment plant.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Pittsburgh District has entered into a more than $3.3-million project partnership agreement with the city of Chester to complete upgrades to the city’s water treatment plant.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Pittsburgh District has entered into a more than $3.3-million project partnership agreement with the city of Chester to complete upgrades to the city’s water treatment plant.

The partnership agreement is the first step in the rehabilitation of the raw-water intake system at the city’s water treatment plant. The upgrades include replacement of the water intake system, installation of new electrical control equipment, and rehabilitation of portions of the water distribution system.

"Ensuring unclean water doesn't make it into our rivers and streams is tremendously important," said Col. Andrew "Coby" Short, commander, Pittsburgh District. "Projects like these allow the federal government, through the Corps of Engineers, to positively impact our communities' drinking water.”

The raw water intake system is in poor condition and beyond repair. Failure of the system could result in the inability to provide clean water to the city’s residents. The upgrades at the plant will improve efficiency and allow the city to meet the demands of the water treatment process.

“The plant upgrades will improve the dependability of the system and enable the city to provide clean water to its residents,” said Project Manager Scott Swansinger, Pittsburgh District.

U.S. Rep. David McKinley, 1st Congressional District representative, has worked closely with the Pittsburgh District to champion projects like these for communities such as the city of Chester.

“Communities across West Virginia face challenges related to aging water systems. Finding funding requires planning and creativity,” said McKinley. “I am pleased the City of Chester has worked with the U.S. Army Corps to advance this project, which is critical for modernizing its drinking water and wastewater infrastructure.”

The contract work is estimated to be completed by November 2023.

The government shares the cost of the project with the sponsor at a rate of 75 to 25 percent, respectively, under the Section 219 environmental infrastructure program.

BACKGROUND: Section 219 of the Water Resources Development Act (WRDA) of 1992 (PL 102-580), authorizes the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to provide design and/or construction assistance to non-federal interests for carrying out water-related environmental infrastructure and resource protection and development projects within Hancock County, West Virginia.

Pittsburgh District’s 26,000 square miles include portions of western Pennsylvania, northern West Virginia, eastern Ohio, western Maryland and southwestern New York. It includes more than 328 miles of navigable waterways, 23 navigation locks and dams, 16 multi-purpose flood-control reservoirs, 42 local flood-protection projects, and other projects to protect and enhance the nation’s water resources infrastructure and environment.

FOLLOW the Pittsburgh District: Twitter, Facebook and Flickr.

Know.Take.Wear. Know the waterways. Take a safety course. Wear your life jacket.

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Contact
Carol Vernon
412-395-7500/01/02
412-713-4626 (cell)
CELRP-PA@usace.army.mil
412-395-7503 (fax)
1000 Liberty Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15222

Release no. 20-148