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Protecting fragile coasts and improving community resilience

Engineering With Nature® Podcast, Season 1: Episode 8

Published Oct. 14, 2020
A new podcast series tells the stories of how, over the last 10 years, a growing international community of practitioners, scientists, engineers, and researchers across many disciplines and organizations are working together to combine natural and engineering systems to solve problems and diversify infrastructure value by applying the principles and practices of Engineering With Nature®.

A new podcast series tells the stories of how, over the last 10 years, a growing international community of practitioners, scientists, engineers, and researchers across many disciplines and organizations are working together to combine natural and engineering systems to solve problems and diversify infrastructure value by applying the principles and practices of Engineering With Nature®.

Contractors plant a section of Mordecai Island that had previously been restored with dredged material. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' Philadelphia District and its contractor removed critical shoals from the New Jersey Intracoastal Waterway and used the material to restore a portion of Mordecai Island marshland. The island serves two important functions within Barnegat Bay: it provides habitat for wildlife and augments overall coastal resiliency for the backbay communities of Long Beach Island.

Contractors plant a section of Mordecai Island that had previously been restored with dredged material. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' Philadelphia District and its contractor removed critical shoals from the New Jersey Intracoastal Waterway and used the material to restore a portion of Mordecai Island marshland. The island serves two important functions within Barnegat Bay: it provides habitat for wildlife and augments overall coastal resiliency for the backbay communities of Long Beach Island.

The Dredge Fullerton, owned and operated by Barnegat Bay Dredging Company, conducts dredging in the New Jersey Intracoastal Waterway near Stone Harbor, N.J. as part of a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers project. The sediment was placed to create habitat on marshland managed by the New Jersey Division of Fish & Wildlife.

The Dredge Fullerton, owned and operated by Barnegat Bay Dredging Company, conducts dredging in the New Jersey Intracoastal Waterway near Stone Harbor, N.J. as part of a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers project. The sediment was placed to create habitat on marshland managed by the New Jersey Division of Fish & Wildlife.

Newly created colonial nesting bird habitat at Ring Island has been successfully utilized by black skimmers (pictured), common and least terns and American oystercatchers ⸺ all state endangered species or species of special concern in the state of New Jersey. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and partners have successfully constructed multiple dredging and marsh restoration/habitat creation projects in coastal New Jersey.

Newly created colonial nesting bird habitat at Ring Island has been successfully utilized by black skimmers (pictured), common and least terns and American oystercatchers ⸺ all state endangered species or species of special concern in the state of New Jersey. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and partners have successfully constructed multiple dredging and marsh restoration/habitat creation projects in coastal New Jersey.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers partnered with the state of New Jersey, The Nature Conservancy, Green Trust Alliance and The Wetlands Institute to create nesting bird habitat at Ring Island near Stone Harbor, New Jersey. Sandy dredged material was placed on the site in 2014 and again in 2018. The newly created colonial nesting bird habitat has been successfully utilized by black skimmers, common and least terns and American oystercatchers ⸺ all state endangered species or species of special concern in the state of New Jersey.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers partnered with the state of New Jersey, The Nature Conservancy, Green Trust Alliance and The Wetlands Institute to create nesting bird habitat at Ring Island near Stone Harbor, New Jersey. Sandy dredged material was placed on the site in 2014 and again in 2018. The newly created colonial nesting bird habitat has been successfully utilized by black skimmers, common and least terns and American oystercatchers ⸺ all state endangered species or species of special concern in the state of New Jersey.

In April 2019, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the State of New Jersey’s Department of Environmental Protection and The Wetlands Institute launched the Seven Mile Island Innovation Lab. The initiative is designed to advance and improve dredging and marsh restoration techniques in coastal New Jersey through innovative research, collaboration, knowledge sharing and practical application.

In April 2019, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the State of New Jersey’s Department of Environmental Protection and The Wetlands Institute launched the Seven Mile Island Innovation Lab. The initiative is designed to advance and improve dredging and marsh restoration techniques in coastal New Jersey through innovative research, collaboration, knowledge sharing and practical application.

Monica Chasten (middle) discusses dredging and placement operations with USACE Inspector Charlie Yates (left) and Joe Hill (right), owner of Barnegat Bay Dredging Company. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has partnered with the state of New Jersey and several non-profit organizations on a dredging and marsh restoration project along the New Jersey Intracoastal Waterway. The demonstration project involves dredging critical shoals from the waterway and restoring ecological habitat.

Monica Chasten (middle) discusses dredging and placement operations with USACE Inspector Charlie Yates (left) and Joe Hill (right), owner of Barnegat Bay Dredging Company. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has partnered with the state of New Jersey and several non-profit organizations on a dredging and marsh restoration project along the New Jersey Intracoastal Waterway. The demonstration project involves dredging critical shoals from the waterway and restoring ecological habitat.

VICKSBURG, Miss. – In this episode of the new Engineering With Nature® Podcast, guest Monica Chasten, a project manager for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Philadelphia District’s Operations Division, discusses Engineering With Nature (EWN) and her work and collaboration with other scientists and engineers to advance coastal dredging practices and the beneficial use of dredged material.

Chasten grew up in Vineland, New Jersey, close to southern New Jersey beaches where her parents and grandparents fostered her love for the coast. With an aptitude for math and science, she started looking at the coast in a different way, wondering why the waves would break the way they did and how “piles of rocks” could protect the fragile shoreline. She translated her passion into a 35-year career as a USACE coastal engineer.  Chasten was the moving force leading Philadelphia Distict to become the third USACE EWN Proving Ground in 2016.  

As a project manager, Chasten’s role involves maintaining coastal navigation channels in New Jersey and Delaware, including the 117-mile New Jersey Intracoastal Waterway. She is also the lead for the District’s EWN efforts.

In 2012, Superstorm Sandy devastated the coast and was, according to Chasten, “the worst storm that has hit the New Jersey coastline in my lifetime and in my professional experience.” With roads closed, she visited the area by boat to assess navigation channels. She observed houses in the bay, navigation channels blocked with sediment and debris everywhere.  Her mission was to restore navigation, given the life safety issues associated with shoaling in the federal channels.

For years, USACE had been looking at how best to use sediment. People generally accepted that there were better options than basically “throwing dredged material away” in upland areas, but traditional policies and standard practices often presented obstacles to trying anything different. Post-Sandy, however, more favorable conditions for innovation emerged that provided opportunities to apply Regional Sediment Management and Engineering With Nature approaches to produce a range of value through beneficial use.

Working with colleagues across USACE, the state of New Jersey, private industry and nonprofit organizations, Chasten initiated pilot programs that put EWN principles into practice for which she received the EWN Leadership Award in 2016. One project involved dredging the New Jersey Intracoastal Waterway navigation channel and using the sediment to restore nearby Mordecai Island, a critical habitat and protective buffer that was degrading because of erosion. Owing to her persistence, sediment dredged from the navigation channel was placed to stabilize the most vulnerable section of the island. This effort complemented the work of others, including the State of New Jersey and the Mordecai Land Trust, and served to protect this valuable habitat while providing an important buffer against waves and destructive storm surge for the nearby community. Other pilot projects undertaken in partnership with the state of New Jersey and others in the Cape May Wetlands Wildlife Management Area include the Avalon marsh enhancement and Ring Island habitat creation projects.

After successfully completing several projects, USACE, the state of New Jersey and The Wetlands Institute launched the Seven Mile Island Innovation Lab (SMIIL). The initiative is designed to advance and improve dredging and marsh restoration techniques in coastal New Jersey through innovative research, collaboration, knowledge sharing and practical application. SMIIL has brought together a diverse group of organizations to test, demonstrate and innovate in delivering engineering, environmental and societal benefits.  

Sediment is an important resource that can be used to protect the wetlands. In turn, the wetlands help protect coastal communities. Throughout our conversation, Chasten highlights the importance and value of collaboration on science, research and development. She talks about learning from others who have conducted similar projects, sharing experiences across the coastal community, and engaging with stakeholders to innovate, develop and apply better practices for preserving fragile coastal environments and the communities they protect.