US Army Corps of Engineers
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Headquarters Website

Power of the pump, no telework

Published April 20, 2020
.

IN THE PHOTO, Pumping Plant Operator Leaderman William “Billy” Ray records fuel readings at the pumping plant.

.

IN THIS PHOTO, looking south at the intake bay of the Graham Burke Pumping Station.

.

IN THE PHOTO, Pumping Plant Operator John “Brady” Foran records engine readings at the pumping plant.

.

IN THE PHOTO, Northwest view of the pumping station with little island Bayou floodgate on the right and White River in the right hand upper background

.

IN THE PHOTO, an aerial shot of the Graham Burke Pumping Station.

While many people are at home working in front of a computer, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers have people out in the field operating equipment and facilities that, at this point in time, cannot be controlled from a workstation at home.

The Graham Burke Pumping Plant is one of those “pieces” of equipment that requires people to be on-site for safe operation. Pumping Plant Operator Leaderman William “Billy” Ray and Pumping Plant Operator John “Brady” Foran are two of those valuable employees who are called upon to run one of the Corps’ most valuable facilities.

As of April 19, 2020, the Grand Burke Pumping Plant has operated and pumped a total of 99 days and removed more than 31 inches of rainfall this year; that’s more than 2,000 hours of pumping time so far this year!

Graham Burke Pumping Plant employees William "Billy" Ray and John "Brady" Foran record engine and fuel readings as part of their daily work routines at the work site.

The Graham Burke Pumping Plant was constructed in the early 1960s and is operated and maintained by the Memphis District and is located on the White River Backwater Levee near Elaine, Arkansas.

This plant is an essential Flood Risk Management feature within the Memphis District's boundary.  Without pumping, approximately 69,000 acres would be subject to overflow by impounded runoff and for an adjacent area of approximately 41,000 acres.