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National Nonstructural Flood Proofing Committee (NFPC)

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Nonstructural Flood Proofing measures are permanent or contingent measures applied to a structure and/or its contents that prevent or provide resistance to damage from flooding.  Nonstructural Food Proofing measures differ from Structural Flood Proofing measures in that they focus on reducing the consequences on flooding instead of focusing on reducing the probability of flooding.  Nonstructural Flood Proofing measures include:

  • Elevation
  • Relocation
  • Buyout / Acquisition
  • Dry flood proofing
  • Wet flood proofing
  • Local berms or floodwalls
  • Flood warning & preparedness
  • Flood insurance

The National Nonstructural Flood Proofing Committee was founded in 1985 to promote the use of nonstructural flood proofing methods.

For additional information on the National Nonstructural/Flood Proofing Committee and its activities, contact:

Corps of Engineers, CENWO-ED-HB

National Nonstructural Flood Proofing Committee

Attn:  Randall Behm
1616 Capitol Ave:  Ste 9000
Omaha, NE 68102-4901

402-995-2322

E-mail the NFPC

During the early 1970's, the Flood Plain Management Services (FPMS) Program, under it's Guides, Pamphlets, and Supporting Studies element, was pursuing several flood proofing initiatives.  Larry Flanagan, Chief FPMS in LMVD, was involved in residential flood proofing systems and in testing flood proofing materials at the Waterways Experiment Station (WES); Sam Cowan, Chief FPMS at SAD, was involved in developing a flood proofing primer and in documenting the elevating of a residence  located along Peachtree Creek in Atlanta, GA; Herm Lardieri, Chief FPMS in Pittsburgh District, was involved in developing standards of flood proofing in buildings and related codes and in drafting EP 1165-2-314; Flood-Proofing Regulations; and Bob Hall, Chief FPMS in Los Angeles District, was seeking flood proofing techniques that would prevent sheet-flow flooding of  structures in California.  As flood proofing activities continued to increase, it became evident that some means of coordination was needed.

An Ad-hoc Committee on Residential Flood Proofing was formed in May of 1978.  It was chaired by Larry Flanagan with Sam Cowan, Herm Lardieri, and Bob Hall as members and Bob Plott as OCE Coordinator.  It was dedicated to residential flood proofing and its activities were  loosely coordinated.  Much of its work and its accomplishments involved completing the work initiated by its individual members and avoiding overlap.  The ad-hoc committee met twice, once in 1978 and once in 1979.  In 1980, Bob Hall left the FPMS Program and the committee.  In 1984, Larry Flanagan left the committee and Dr. Carl Pace was brought on board as a technical advisor for the work he and Larry were doing on testing flood proofing materials at WES.  The committee's last effort was to acquire the materials that were used by headquarters to publish Flood Proofing Systems & Techniques - Examples of flood proofed structures in the United States.

It became evident that a means of coordinating and providing direction to future flood proofing activities under the FPMS Program was necessary.  Hence, charter members were appointed on 20 September 1985 and on 8-9 October 1985 the initial meeting  of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers National Flood Proofing Committee (NFPC) was held at SAD to finalize a Committee charter and to elect Committee officers.

The NFPC charter was ratified at headquarters by the Chief, Flood Plain Management Services and Coastal Resources Branch and signed by the Chief, Planning Division, Directorate of Civil Works, Office of the Chief of Engineers on 12 December 1985. It subsequently was revised in 1990, 1994, and 2006 primarily to increase the number of its members from the initial five to seven and then to nine.  Currently, there are seven members.

The National Nonstructural Flood Proofing Committee is celebrating 27 years of service to the nation in flood risk management.

The National Nonstructural Flood Proofing Committee functions under the general direction of the Chief, Planning Community of Practice, Directorate of Civil Works, HQUSACE.  The objectives of the NFPC are to: 

  • Promote the development and use of all nonstructural flood risk reduction measures
  • Risk expertise on all aspects of nonstructural flood risk reduction and associated opportunities
  • Disseminate nonstructural flood reduction information
  • Partner with Planning Centers of Expertise in all aspects of nonstructural flood risk reduction and associated opportunities
  • Provide leadership in all aspects of floodplain management

NFPC Charter:  The current NFPC Charter can be downloaded HERE.

Current NFPC Membership:

 

Randall Behm, P.E., Chairman, GS-13
Chief, Flood Risk and Floodplain Management Services Section,
District Flood Risk Manager
U.S. Army Engineer District, Omaha
 
Education:         
               BS degree in Civil Engineering-University of Nebraska
 
Professional Registration:   
               Professional Engineer
               Certified Floodplain Manager  
          
25 years of Experience in:
               Floodplain Management
               Hydraulic Engineering
               Plan Formulation
               Project Management
               Cultural Resources
               Program Management
               Engineering Surveys
               Nonstructural Flood Damage Reduction 
 Kim M. Gavigan, P.E., Executive Secretary, GS-13
Chief, Water Resources Planning Section C
Flood Risk Program Manager
 U.S. Army Engineer District, Los Angeles / Phoenix
 
Education:         
            BS degree in Civil Engineering Technology-Northern Arizona University
 
Professional Registration:   
            Professional Engineer
            Certified Floodplain Manager  
          
21 years of Experience in:
            Flood Plain Management / Flood Risk Management
            Hydrology & Hydraulics
            Plan Formulation
            Project Management
            Ecosystem Restoration Planning
                        Watershed Management Planning
            Program Management
            Nonstructural Flood Damage Reduction
                        National Flood Insurance Program
                        Stormwater Management
 Joe Remondini, P.E., Member; GS-13
Project Manager, Flood Plain Management Services
U.S. Army Engineer District, Tulsa
 
Education: 
               BS degree in Civil Engineering-New Mexico State University
               MS degree in Water Resources Engineering-Oklahoma State University
 
Professional Registration:   
               Professional Engineer
               Certified Floodplain Manager
 
36 years of Experience in:
               Floodplain Management
               Hydraulics
               Hydrology
               Nonstructural Flood Damage Reduction
 Clark Frentzen, P.E., Member; GS-15
Chief, Planning and Policy
South Pacific Division, USACE
 
Director, USACE Flood Risk Management Planning Center of Expertise
 
Education:      
               BS degree in Civil Engineering-University of California
               MS degree in Civil/Environmental Engineering
 
Professional Registration:   
               Professional Engineer
 
36 years of Experience in:
               CW Planning
               Comprehensive Flood Plain Management
               Plan Formulation
               Hydrologic Engineering
               Ecosystem Restoration Planning
               Nonstructural Flood Damage Reduction
               Recreation Analysis
               NED Analysis
               NER Analysis
 Stuart Davis, Member; GS-13
Community Planner/Economist
Institute for Water Resources
 
Education:      
               BA degree in Economics- University of Illinois
               MA degree in Urban Affairs-St Louis University
               MA degree in Economics-University of Colorado
 
Professional Registration:   
               Certified Planner-American Institute of Certified Planners
 
37 years of Experience in:
               Economics
               Study Management
               Public Involvement
               Principal investigator with IWR
               Plan Formulation
               Statistical Analysis
               NED Analysis
 Stephen D. O’Leary, R.A.; Member, GS-13
Architect/Planner/Project Manager
U.S. Army Engineer District, Huntington
 
Education:
            Bachelor of Architecture – University of Kentucky
 
Professional Registration:
            Professional Architect
            Certified Floodplain Manager
 
28 years of Experience in:
            Architectural Design and Construction
            Mitigation of Flood Prone Structures/Floodproofing
            Nonstructural Flood Risk Management
            Floodplain Management
            Plan Formulation
            Program/Project Management
 Keven Lovetro, CFM, Member; GS-13
Supervisory, Regional Economist
Flood Risk Management Section - Economics Branch
U.S. Army Engineer District, New Orleans
 
Education:      
            BA degree in Political Science - University of New Orleans
            MA degree in International Affairs - George Washington
                    University
            MA degree in Economics and Finance - University of New
                Orleans
 
Professional Registration:   
            Certified Floodplain Manager
 
26 years of Experience in:
            Economics
            Financial Analysis
            NED analysis
            Civil Works Planning
            Nonstructural Flood Risk Management
            Social Impact Analysis
            Plan Formulation
            Navigation

Flood risk is a combination of two components; the chance (or probability) of a particular flood event and the impact (or consequence) that the flood would cause if it occurred.  Flood damage reduction measures can either reduce the chance of flooding or the impact of flooding.  Structural measures such as dams, levees, and floodwalls alter the characteristics of the flood and reduce the probability of flooding in the location of interest.  Nonstructural measures alter the impact or consequences of flooding and have little to no impact of the characteristics of flood.

Nonstructural Flood Proofing measures include:

  • Elevation
  • Relocation
  • Buyout / Acquisition
  • Dry Flood Proofing
  • Wet Flood Proofing
  • Local Berms or Floodwalls
  • Flood Warning & Preparedness
  • Flood Insurance

The following initial assessment tool provides a quick reference for comparing the applicability of different flood damage reduction measures including Structural and Nonstructural Measures.

A brief presentation of the different Nonstructural Measures is provided below.  Detailed discussion on each of these types of Nonstructural Measures can be found in the Publications and Guidance sections of this website. 

Elevation involves raising the buildings in place so that the structure sees a reduction in frequency and/or depth of flooding during high-water events.  Elevation can be done on fill, foundation walls, piers, piles, posts or columns. Selection of proper elevation method depends on flood characteristics such as flood depth or velocity.

Relocation involves moving the structure to another location away from flood hazards.  Relocation is the most dependable method of protection and provides the benefit of use of the evacuated floodplain.

Buyout/Acquisition involves  purchase and elimination of flood damageable structures, allowing for inhabitants to relocate to locations away from flood hazards.

Dry Flood Proofing involves sealing building walls with waterproofing compounds, impermeable sheeting, or other materials to prevent the entry of floodwaters into damageable structures.  Dry flood proofing is applicable in areas of shallow, low velocity flooding.

Wet Flood Proofing measures allows floodwater to enter the structure, vulnerable items such as utilities appliances and furnaces are relocated or waterproofed to higher locations.  By allowing floodwater to enter the structure hydrostatic forces on the inside and outside of the structure can be equalized reducing the risk of structural damage.

Local Levees and Floodwalls are freestanding structures located away from the building that prevent the encroachment of floodwaters.

Flood Warning Systems alert inhabitants in flood prone areas of impending high water.  Depending on the type of warning system and advance time inhabitants have the opportunity to evacuate damageable property and themselves from the flood prone area.

Flood Insurance provides insurance to assist in recovery from a flood event

 

 

For National Nonstructural Flood Proofing Committee publications, contact...

 

Corps of Engineers, CENWO-ED-HB
National Nonstructural Flood Proofing Committee

Attn:  Randall Behm
1616 Capitol Ave Ste 9000
Omaha, NE 68102-4901
402-995-2322

Events:  The following events may be of interest to those involved in nonstructural measures of flood proofing alternatives

Links:  Although the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers does not endorse the following websites, they are provided in as much as they contain information related to nonstructural measures to reduce flood damages and promote flood proofing techniques:

  • ASFPM - Association of State Floodplain Managers is an organization of professionals involved in floodplain management, flood hazard mitigation, the National Flood Insurance Program, and flood preparedness, warning and recovery.
  • FEMA - FEMA is the US government agency tasked with administering the NFIP Program, disaster mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery planning.  
  • NAFSMA  - The National Association of Flood and Stormwater Management Agencies
  • Natural Hazards Center - University of Colorado of Boulder works to strengthen communication between the hazards academic and applications communities and to improve the implementation of hazard mitigation and response programs.  The Center's publications program involves editing and distribution of many types of publications, including documents on the subject of flood proofing.
  • USACE Flood Risk Management Program - The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) established the National Flood Risk Management Program in May 2006 for the purpose of integrating and synchronizing USACE flood risk management programs and activities.