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Navy’s SPAWAR sees reduced energy costs with Huntsville Center’s Energy Savings Performance Contract

The U.S. Navy’s Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command Systems Center Pacific used a Huntsville Center Energy Savings Performance Contract to reduce energy costs. The ESPC model used at Huntsville Center is an agreement between the government and an energy service contractor which provides capital and expertise to make comprehensive energy and water efficiency improvements on facilities or implement new renewable energy capabilities and maintains them in exchange for a portion of the generated savings.
Published: 5/5/2015

Engineering Minds

To engage young minds and provide a hands-on learning opportunity for students, the Charleston
Published: 5/1/2015

French grad student studies California biodiversity

When a doctoral student from the University of Versailles needed to understand how America balances urban development with natural preservation, she visited the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Sacramento District.
Published: 5/1/2015

Army’s first resource efficiency manager workshop filled with passion for energy management

The Army’s first Resource Efficiency Manager (REM) Workshop was April 15-17 on Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. Huntsville Center, which manages the REM program, hosted the event to enhance the knowledge base of the growing network of REMs across the Army and Army Reserve.
Published: 4/28/2015

Pilot project helps USACE evaluate changing climate across Southwest

During the next century, the Southwestern United States is anticipated to warm at a rate second only to Alaska, driving up evaporation rates, driving down soil moisture, and resulting in reduced stream flow, increased erosion/sedimentation, and increased wildfire severity and forest loss. These changes are likely to radically transform the region's watersheds, altering flood hydrology, further disrupting riparian ecosystems, and decreasing surface water supplies by 20 to 25 percent. With drought conditions anticipated to occur in 80 percent of the years between now and 2100, water is anticipated to be the defining issue of this century.
Published: 4/27/2015

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