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Archive: 2014
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  • October

    Restoring a former Atlas Missile site in Nebraska

    On Oct. 7, 2014, an Omaha District Environmental Remediation team led by Hector Santiago, project manager, won the biennial Secretary of the Army Environmental Award in Environmental Restoration-Installation for 2013. The honor, given by IMCOM subordinate command U.S. Army Environmental Command, recognizes and rewards “excellence in the development, management, and transferability of environmental programs that increase environmental quality, enhance the mission, and support Army sustainability.” Each award is for a two-year performance period and the 2013 award covers achievements from Oct. 1, 2011 through Sept. 30, 2013.
  • Corps Booth Helps Girl Scouts Learn About STEM

    The District had a booth at the 2014 Girl Scouts STEM Camporee Sept. 13, 2014, where more than 700 Scouts learned more about endangered species, how and why dams are built, and Unexploded Ordnance (UXO) safety.
  • Restoring Quality Habitat and Combating Invasive Plants at Times Beach

    The Buffalo District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center are collaborating on a demonstration project to control the growth of four invasive plants at Times Beach Nature Preserve in Buffalo.
  • A multigenerational workforce brings opportunities, challenges for the Corps

    Famous author Rick Riorden once wrote, “People are more difficult to work with than machines. And when you break a person, he can't be fixed.” While Mr. Riorden was writing about a Greek god in one of his fictional books, the sentiment can be applied to any workplace environment. The bottom line is this: for any organization to be successful, it is crucial to take care of the people that make it run.
  • The secret to her success: ops chief shares some key milestones on the road to career success

    We all have that “tipping point” in life, that moment when circumstances converge to change our future direction forever. For graduating college senior Andrea Murdock in 1988, that point came as she was pursuing various options for post-college employment. On the one hand, she had already decided that she wanted to be a park ranger and had interviewed for a park ranger job with three different Army Corps of Engineers Districts—St. Louis, Huntington, and Mobile—at a job fair in El Paso.
  • Santa Clara Pueblo and the Corps of Engineers: A Working Partnership between Two Nations

    "The partnership between USACE and the Santa Clara Pueblo is a fine example of why the Albuquerque District has the strongest Tribal Program in South Pacific Division. Flood Risk Management in the Santa Clara tribal area is incredibly important for the future of the Pueblo,” said Brig. Gen. Mark Toy, commander, South Pacific Division, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.
  • September

    Corps awards $12 million contract to build islands near Lansing, Iowa

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, St. Paul District, recently awarded a nearly $12 million contract to Newt Marine Services of Dubuque, Iowa, to restore habitat within the Mississippi River Pool 9.
  • Huntington District artifacts transferred to the Veterans Curation Program

    Thanks to the efforts of a team of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) archaeological experts, artifacts from nine West Virginia project sites have been transferred to the Veterans Curation Program (VCP) from storage at the Grave Creek Mound Archaeological Complex in Moundsville, W.Va.
  • USACE participates in Phoenix STEM event

    Capt. Adam Z. McGinnis, the deputy area engineer for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District's Arizona-Nevada Area Office, and 1st Lt. Luke Ritz, a project engineer at the District’s Fort Huachuca Resident Office, participated in a Science, Technology, Engineering and Math event held Sept. 25 at the Phoenix Convention Center by Ten80 Education, a national program aimed at cultivating STEM skills in youth.
  • National award winners recognized for excellence

    Ten members of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) were honored Aug. 7 as they received awards during the National Awards ceremony. Lt. Gen. Thomas P. Bostick, Chief of Engineers and USACE commander, presented the awards during the USACE Senior Leaders Conference at Fort Belvoir, Virginia.
  • U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Soldier Receives Soldier's Medal

    Not all military awards for bravery are earned in combat. On Sept. 5, Maj. Adam J. Czekanski received the Soldier’s Medal for leaping in front of an oncoming train to rescue a man who had fallen on the tracks. The Soldier’s Medal is the highest U.S. Army award given for valor in a non-combat situation.
  • Army Corps of Engineers waives fees on National Public Lands Day, Sept. 27

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) will waive day use fees at its more than 2,200 USACE-operated recreation areas nationwide in recognition of National Public Lands Day on Sept. 27. On this day, fees normally charged at boat launch ramps and swimming beaches will be waived.
  • July

    Craney Island safety, health management program reaches pinnacle, earns VPP Star status

    PORTSMOUTH, Va. -- The bulletin board just inside the door of Craney Island project office here has a folder with blank reports for “near misses.”
  • Kansas City District supports Pacific Command in Southeast Asia

    "The times, they are a-changin'," sang Bob Dylan 50 years ago as the U.S. Army fought a war in Vietnam. What would Dylan think today when a member of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) visited Vietnam in May to present dam safety information to stakeholders from across Southeast Asia?
  • Reducing the impact of invasive species through partnership

    In an effort to reduce the impact of invasive species, Coralville Lake was one of the first agencies to sign a memorandum of understanding with the Hawkeye Cooperative Weed Management Area (CWMA) in 2007. This partnership is just one of the ways the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is working with others to fight invasive species. Since then, the Mississippi River Project has also signed an MOU with them.
  • Stopping an aggressive aquatic hitchhiker

    Buffalo District, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC),
  • Florida agencies work together

    Across Florida and throughout the nation, invasive species bring with them high ecological and economic costs. It’s far too big a problem for just one agency or group. The Florida Invasive Species Partnership (FISP) is a collaborative group of federal, state and local agencies and non-government organizations, all with a stake in managing non-native species in Florida. FISP facilitates the formation of Cooperative Invasive Species Management Areas (CISMAs), alliances of stakeholders addressing regional invasive species management. Some of the concerns they try to address include prevention, education/awareness, early detection, rapid response, monitoring and integrated pest management.
  • Nipping invasive air potato 'in the spud'

    It’s almost like a scene from a science fiction movie. Florida is being taken over by potatoes. Yes, potatoes. So, what do you do when foreign potatoes invade and attempt to take over the native plants? You try to “nip it in the spud!”
  • Slowing the spread of new invasives

    For the past decade, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and state departments of natural resources — especially those near the Great Lakes — have focused their efforts on controlling the migration of Asian Carp, a known invasive species, before it reaches the Great Lakes. It’s been a challenge.
  • U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ trail designated as a National Recreation Trail

    The North Slope Trail at Lake Sonoma, in Healdsburg, California, has been designated a national recreation trail by the U.S. Department of the Interior. The trail is managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, San Francisco District and is among 21 trails nationwide designated this year as new national recreation trails.
  • Congress authorizes eight Jacksonville District projects

    Eight U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville District projects that will provide critical infrastructure to local ports and ecosystem restoration efforts in Florida received approval as part of the Water Resources Reform and Development Act (WRRDA) of 2014, which was signed by President Barack Obama June 10.
  • Eyre relinquishes command of Transatlantic Division, retires

    Maj. Gen. Michael Eyre, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Transatlantic Division commander, relinquished command and retired from the U.S. Army during a Relinquishment of Command and Retirement Ceremony June 27 at the Stonewall Jackson headquarters here.
  • USACE commander urges U.S. infrastructure improvement

    WASHINGTON-- The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers faces aging technology, shortage of funding and a lack of citizen awareness, said its commander. Lt. Gen. Thomas P. Bostick, the Army's chief of engineers and USACE commanding general, spoke Thursday, at a Civil Works Infrastructure roundtable conference.
  • June

    Portland District partner named best in nation

    A key Portland District recreation partner has been named best in the nation by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.
  • Osan resident office builds on Air Force vision

    With a heritage that dates back to construction of the Washington Monument, Panama Canal and the Pentagon, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Osan Resident Office has a lot to live up to. The team of 20 doesn't let that intimidate them as they strive to enhance the base's infrastructure and give substance to the plans their Air Force partners have for the future. "We're working on six host nation-funded projects right now," said Jamie Hagio, USACE ORO resident engineer. "There's always a new challenge - it's never the same thing every day."