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  • Corps recreation sites host Earth Day celebration events

    In recognition of Earth Day, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Pittsburgh District will host events at several reservoirs across its multistate region. We invite the public to join us as we clean up the environment, plant trees and restore local ecosystems to support the earth for years to come.
  • Corps temporarily closes Kellettville recreation area campgrounds at Tionesta Lake

    Due to ice chunks from a recent high-water event along Tionesta Creek, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Pittsburgh District is temporarily closing the Kellettville recreation area at Tionesta Lake.
  • Women of the Pittsburgh District: Jessa Farmer

    In celebration of Women's History Month, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Pittsburgh District is highlighting several of the many women in the district whose talent and expertise support our communities and our nation. Today we had a conversation with Jessa Farmer, Pittsburgh District's Geotechnical and Water Resources Branch Chief about her experiences and what Women's History Month means to her.
  • Celebrating Black History Month

    Every February, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Pittsburgh District joins the nation to observe and reflect on the tremendous contributions that African Americans have made to our country and our history. As 2022’s Black History Month ends, we took time to talk with some of our people and ask them about their experiences and perspectives that both empowered and shaped them. Although only three Black voices were interviewed, Black History Month is an opportunity for the corps to share some of our employees’ perspectives on Black history and what it means to them.
  • If you do what you love

    “If you do what you love, you’ll never work a day in your life.” Whether it was Marc Anthony or inspired by Confucius, the quote has existed for centuries but is still true today. This Valentine’s Day, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Pittsburgh District highlights some of our employees who do what they love while accomplishing critical roles that deliver the district’s mission to the nation. We asked them about their childhood hobbies and interests and how those passions grew into careers.
  • Pittsburgh District joins Duquesne University to form a stunning partnership

    Every organization says they are a learning organization, but the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has taken its quest for innovation to a stunning level. During the 2021 recreation season, experts from the Pittsburgh District began a partnership with Duquesne University’s biology department. The goal was to test water quality within Crooked Creek Lake’s watershed called an “electrofishing survey,” which the corps had not used before.
  • Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Acts provides more than $881.9 million in supplemental funding

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Pittsburgh District released its Fiscal Year 2022 Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (IIJA) supplemental funding for Construction, Continuing Authorities Program, Environmental Infrastructure, and Operations and Maintenance, Jan. 20.
  • Hundreds attend Eagle Fest at Shenango River Lake

    As people’s schedules start calming down after the Christmas season, bird enthusiasts and nature lovers alike had the chance to come together at Shenango River Lake and learn about America’s avian rockstar: the bald eagle.
  • Corps upgrades Paden City’s wastewater treatment systems

    Ever had a problem with the septic tank in your yard? The cost to replace it, and consequences if you do not, can really stink – even more so when the problem is on a community-wide level. That is why the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Pittsburgh District is partnering with Paden City to upgrade the sanitary sewer collection and treatment facilities in Tyler and Wetzel counties as part of a $2 million environmental infrastructure project.
  • Using sunshine, plastic, and pollination to help the environment

    Can plastic help birds, bees, butterflies, and bass? It can, if the plastic is part of a process called solarization, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ staff at Mosquito Creek Lake are using it to improve the entire regional watershed.