HEADQUARTERS

Home
As the nation's environmental engineer, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers manages one of the largest federal environmental missions: restoring degraded ecosystems; constructing sustainable facilities; regulating waterways; managing natural resources; and, cleaning up contaminated sites from past military activities. The Corps Environment highlights many of the Army Corps of Engineers and Armywide environmental and sustainability efforts across the globe.
The Corps Environment: January 2016
As the nation's environmental engineer, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers manages one of the largest federal environmental missions: restoring degraded ecosystems; constructing sustainable facilities; regulating waterways; managing natural resources; and, cleaning up contaminated sites from past military activities. The Corps Environment highlights many of the Army Corps of Engineers and Armywide environmental and sustainability efforts across the globe.
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) recently announced a new national adult water safety campaign. The campaign, titled “Life Jackets Worn…Nobody Mourns,” is targeted towards adult males.

In the past 10 years, 88 percent of all USACE water-related fatalities were men and 68 percent were between the ages of 20 and 60. Also, 84 percent of those killed in water-related accidents were not wearing life jackets and 27 percent of boating fatalities were from falls overboard. In addition to boating falls, the activity that caused the most water-related fatalities was swimming in undesignated areas, according to data reported by the USACE National Operations Center (NOC) for Water Safety.
USACE Announces New National Water Safety Campaign
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) recently announced a new national adult water safety campaign. The campaign, titled “Life Jackets Worn…Nobody Mourns,” is targeted towards adult males.
The first engineer officers of the Army were appointed by George Washington on June 16, 1775, during the American Revolution. On March 16, 1802, the Army established the Corps of Engineers as a separate, permanent branch and gave engineers the responsibility for founding and operating the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. Since then, Army Corps of Engineers professionals have responded to changing defense requirements and played an integral part in the development of the country.  Today, they continue the tradition of providing vital engineering solutions, in collaboration with their partners, to secure the nation, energize the economy and reduce rick from disaster. This U.S. Army Corps of Engineers video provides a summary of the organization's missions. Produced in September 2015 by Headquarters USACE and Sacramento District.
What is the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers?
The first engineer officers of the Army were appointed by George Washington on June 16, 1775, during the American Revolution. On March 16, 1802, the Army established the Corps of Engineers as a separate, permanent branch and gave engineers the responsibility for founding and operating the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. Since then, Army Corps of Engineers professionals have responded to changing defense requirements and played an integral part in the development of the country. Today, they continue the tradition of providing vital engineering solutions, in collaboration with their partners, to secure the nation, energize the economy and reduce rick from disaster. This U.S. Army Corps of Engineers video provides a summary of the organization's missions. Produced in September 2015 by Headquarters USACE and Sacramento District.

News

Civil Works secretary visits Navajo Nation

Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works Jo-Ellen Darcy accepted the invitation of Navajo Nation Council Delegate Walter Phelps to visit the Nation and speak to the 2016 Winter Council Session of the Navajo Nation Council Jan. 27.
Published: 1/30/2016

Safety award – Col. Mike Farrell ‘Gets It’

In recognition of his emphasis on workplace safety, Col. Mike Farrell, commander of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Sacramento District, has been named among the CEOs who ‘Get It’ by the National Safety Council.
Published: 1/25/2016

Corps leader updates California maritime industry

Despite a nearly $2 billion budget to maintain the nation's inland waterways and harbors, it simply isn't enough for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to meet all the maritime industry’s infrastructure needs, Maj. Gen. Ed Jackson told attendees at the winter meeting of the California Marine Affairs and Navigation Conference held in Marina del Rey, California, Jan. 21.
Published: 1/21/2016

The Corps feasibility study – finding a balanced solution

How do you eat an elephant? One bite at a time, right? That one-liner serves as a metaphor for how an incredibly complex task can be accomplished by stating a goal, gathering facts, initiating action and formulating an overall plan from a series of achievable objectives using available resources. That also describes how the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers conducts a feasibility study for prospective projects, though we’d work hard to avoid harming an actual elephant.
Published: 1/14/2016

Emergency permit fortifies Pacific Coast Highway

CARLSBAD, Calif. – An emergency authorization issued by the Los Angeles District’s Carlsbad Regulatory Office allowed the City of Carlsbad to place about 1,200 tons of stone and other material along a 270-foot segment of shoreline along the Pacific Coast Highway, stabilizing the shoreline and protecting a vital roadway along Southern California’s coast.
Published: 1/13/2016

Videos