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Tag: water supply
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  • May runoff slightly above average; Fort Peck flow test continues

    Active rainfall patterns across the Midwest provided much needed moisture to several portions of the Missouri River Basin. Large areas of Montana, North Dakota, Wyoming, eastern South Dakota, and eastern Nebraska received more than 200% of normal precipitation for the month of May. However, central South Dakota, western Nebraska, and eastern Colorado received as little as 25% of normal precipitation.
  • Missouri River Basin runoff forecast improves but remains below average; Fort Peck Flow Test underway

    As warmer weather moves into the Missouri River Basin, spring precipitation brought some much-needed moisture throughout the basin. For the month of April, runoff was 2.1 million acre-feet, 71% of average, for the basin above Sioux City, Iowa. The annual runoff forecast for the upper Missouri River Basin above Sioux City is 19.2 MAF, 75% of average, and 1.7 MAF higher than last month’s forecast.
  • Corps of Engineers announces updates to Center Hill Water Control Manual

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (April 24, 2024) – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District completed an Environmental Assessment (EA), under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), to update the Center Hill Dam and Reservoir Water Control Manual. As a result of this update, the Nashville District is implementing operational changes at Center Hill.
  • Upper basin runoff forecast improves, remains below average; Fort Peck test flows to begin in late April

    The latest 2024 calendar year runoff forecast for the Missouri River Basin above Sioux City, Iowa
  • Missouri River Basin spring public meetings announced

    Public Meetings are held each spring and fall across the Missouri River basin. Upper Basin spring public meetings will be held the week of March 25 in North Dakota, South Dakota, and Montana.
  • Despite early runoff, upper basin runoff forecast below average; Gavins Point releases to increase for navigation flow support

    A warm February led to increased snowmelt and runoff in the Missouri River Basin above Sioux City, Iowa. February runoff was 1.8 million acre-feet, 161% of average with above average runoff in every reach except Sioux City, which was near average. However, the updated 2024 calendar year runoff forecast for the basin continues to be below average.   
  • Below average runoff forecast for the upper Missouri River Basin in 2024

    **Last paragraph to note Forecast generation for 2024 is 8.6 billion kWh. It had been incorrectly stated as 2023.** The updated 2024 calendar year runoff forecast for the Missouri River Basin above Sioux City, Iowa, continues to be below average. January runoff in the Missouri River Basin above Sioux City was 0.4 million acre-feet, 56% of average. Runoff was well-below-average due to much-below-normal temperatures over the whole Missouri River Basin and below-normal precipitation over most of the upper basin.
  • Dry conditions expected to persist for the Missouri River Basin

    For the 2023 calendar year, Missouri River Basin runoff above Sioux City, Iowa totaled 30.4 million acre-feet (MAF), 118% of average. Despite the above average runoff last year, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is forecasting below-average runoff into the mainstem reservoir system this year. For 2024, runoff in the Missouri River Basin above Sioux City, Iowa is forecast to be 20.1 MAF, 78% of average.
  • Now Available: Final 2023-2024 Missouri River Operating Plan

    The Final Missouri River Mainstem Reservoir System Annual Operating Plan for the 2023-2024 runoff season is now available. This Annual Operating Plan (AOP) presents the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ regulation of the Missouri River Mainstem Reservoir System through Dec. 2024. The information in the AOP is based on water management guidelines designed to meet the reservoir regulation objectives of the 2018 Missouri River Master Water Control Manual (Master Manual).
  • Gavins Point Dam releases reduced to winter release rate on November 23

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers began reducing the Gavins Point releases to the winter release rate on November 23 with the navigation flow support season ending on December 1 at St. Louis, MO. “Releases from Gavins Point Dam were reduced from 35,000 cubic feet per second to 13,000 cfs by mid-December,” said John Remus, chief of the USACE, Missouri River Water Management Division. “We will closely monitor river conditions, and releases will be adjusted to the extent practical to lessen the impacts of river ice formation on stages in the lower river.”